October 16, 2005

Slipping and falling

I’m taking a quick break from Hervor to supply Mark and me with some essential equipment for the coming winter here in our oil-heated house in Sackville: warm slippers. I’m trying out a pattern from Felted Knits by Beverly Galeskas — it’s impressed me with its total cunning for shaping the toe. I have no idea how it works, all I know is that you cast on for the sole and then in the end you have a complete slipper, without ever casting off or breaking the yarn. You just have to seam the middle of the sole, and she has you make another sole to attach to it for padding and strength. The only problem is that she only gives sizes up to a woman’s large (I guess she thinks the slippers are too pretty for a man) so if I find that the size I made isn’t big enough for Mark, I’ll have to figure out the construction in order to upsize them.

Anyway, here they are unfelted on Mark’s feet — one of them still doesn’t have its second sole, but they’re otherwise finished. I had the black Paton’s Classic left over from the felted vest.

unfeltedslippers.jpg

I have a question for my readers — do you know of a good source for suede (or some other non-slip material) slipper bottoms? Preferably Canadian, but if they ship to Canada it might work. The whole house here is wood floors, so I’m worried about the slippiness factor of felt. No falling down the stairs allowed!

And to close, another fall picture — this one of a maple right outside our house. You can’t really tell in this photo, but it’s an incredibly windy and blustery day today, and the leaves may all be off the tree by evening! I hope not, because I think they’ll turn still more colourful, if they stick around!

falltree.jpg

Posted by Aven at October 16, 2005 10:52 AM
Comments

I read here: http://ma2ut.blogspot.com/2005_02_01_ma2ut_archive.html
(scroll down)
that you can spray the bottoms to stop them from being so slippery, but I haven’t tried it yet.

Posted by: Laura at October 16, 2005 12:51 PM

I know Fibertrends sells suede slipper bottoms but they are expensive. I didn’t put anything on the bottom of mine but then again we have carpeting on the stairs! What about the antislip mats you put under rugs? You could cut it to shape for the sole and stitch it on. Good Luck!

Posted by: Ande at October 16, 2005 12:55 PM

There are suede slipper bottoms at elann.com for a reasonable price.

http://secure.elann.com/productdisp.asp?NAME=Fiber%20Trends%202-Piece%20Suede%20Slipper%20Bottoms

Posted by: Michelle at October 16, 2005 01:30 PM

I don’t know how good this would be… maybe get a piece of Chamois suede like is used to buff cars after they are waxed. You could probably get a pair of bottoms for a womens size out of one piece.

Posted by: Rachel at October 16, 2005 03:25 PM

I’ve heard you can just go to a thrift shop and buy a cheap coat and cut it up. When you think of how many soles you can make out of a single coat, it’s pretty cheap.

Posted by: Julie at October 16, 2005 03:43 PM

There is a leather store right by my house that I use for my leather Booga bag handles. if you want me to pick up some suede/leather, etc, just let me know and I will send it along!

Posted by: Dani at October 16, 2005 06:59 PM

I see someone already has mentioned Elann. I’m intrigued by the slippers is there a pattern to the stitch or is it just plan knitting?
Do you get the wind storm last night?

Posted by: Paula at October 16, 2005 10:50 PM

I used a spray on product called “Grip & Guard” on my husbands slippers. It made them non skid, and also gave some water resistance, which is good, as he occasionally walks around the yard in them (we ususally drink coffee on the back porch in our pjs and robes on the weekend). It has quite an odor when you first apply it, so you will want to let it dry outdoors if possible. I used 2 coats.

Posted by: Rosa at October 17, 2005 12:21 AM

I think I once got some at good ol’ Mary Maxim. They had holes punched all around them and you could easily sew them on.

Posted by: mary deB at October 17, 2005 09:11 AM

Those slippers look great. I don’t have any suggestions for what to do with the bottoms once they have been felted to make them not so slippery, but I think your other readers have come up with some great ideas. :)

Posted by: Samantha at October 17, 2005 12:05 PM

I also heard that you can use puffy paint to put dots or wavy lines on the bottom of your slippers. I haven’t tried it out yet but since it eliminated a sewing step I’m going to try it on my next pair.

Posted by: Laurie at October 18, 2005 04:04 PM